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janz3n
January 23rd, 2012, 08:26 AM
hey guys, im going to be looking for a bike in the near future. im leaning towards a 600 but i'll be taking the ctec course in the spring and fingure what what i feel comfortable on first before buying one. my question is, what are some downfalls with buying an older bike? they are much cheaper and have more mileage i know but it just seems like a cheaper way to go for a first bike plus i wont worry about dropping it as much as a newer one. i know the older once are carb and the newer ones are injected, what are the draw backs of carbs over injection? any info would be great.

the_fornicator
January 23rd, 2012, 09:23 AM
I wondered about this myself and found the following via google:


fuel injection is so much better for many reasons. The carburator can ice up in cold weather. The carburator needs a choke that you adjust till it warms up. The injection starts better and is self adjusting. This self adjusting is really nice if you change altitude while you are riding. You will get better gas milege and have more power with fuel injection. That is because the fuel air ratio is always right on. Carburators can be set just right. But as soon as the outside temp or pressure changes then it is no longer set just right. If You go to work when it is 60 degrees and get off work when it is 90 degrees the fuel injection will still be right on . I would sugest the suzuki M50. The S50 is carburated. Suzuki has a lot of experience with fuel injection. They also have patended fuel injection components that only suzuki has at the moment.

http://hemrickperformance.com/Carb.aspx

http://www.kawasakimotorcycle.org/forum/kawasaki-streetbikes-sportbikes/84064-carburated-vs-fuel-injected.html

CanuckDave
January 23rd, 2012, 09:31 AM
I would say the biggest downfall to an older bike would be finding parts. Even for my 2005 600RR I've had trouble getting a few parts from the dealership because they've stopped producing them. I wouldn't really go any older than 2002-2004 because anything older than that is likely going to be carb'd, and the other big reason is depreciation - a new brand new 600 typically sells for $12-13k, and within a few year it'll be down around $8k, something a bit older (a bike from say.. 2004-2005) you can probably find around $4k and unless it's crashed or there's major problems, they don't go for a lot less than that.

That's the price range I'd be looking at for a first bike, if you buy much older you won't be spending much less, and you'll be getting a bike with modern suspension and won't have to deal with carbs (if the bike isn't running right, you'll have to deal with synchronizing 4 carbs.. I'd rather spend my time riding). Also if you crash the bike, you won't have as much trouble finding parts (finding case covers and things like that for an older bike can be difficult).

Something like this would make a perfect first bike IMO:

http://forums.780tuners.com/showthread.php?140651-FS-2004-Honda-599

pheoxs
January 23rd, 2012, 09:49 AM
Make sure all the maintenance has been done. Most bikes need the valves checked / adjusted around 15k, it can be fairly pricey if the dealer has to do it. Check the tires for tread, that is a few hundred $. Most older bikes will have been dropped, everyone either has gone down or will go down, so look for rashed plastic / bar ends / damage to the frame.

There's a few sport bikes that people tour on and have 100+k kms on them, others are abused and not maintained and have issues at 10k so its hard to judge kms.

Brutetork
January 23rd, 2012, 04:25 PM
Don't even look at the kms on pretty much any bike you'll be buying in Alberta. Our riding season is too short to ever actually put much on. I never even thought about it till my brother moved to Australia and was seeing CBRs and R6s with 150000kms, our high km bikes are like 30k. Just look for a good maintenance history and see if the owner actually appears to give a shit about the bike, that's what kills them.

Now then as far as a carb'd bike goes, personally I've never owned one. However I know a few people who do, all of them wish they had just spent a bit extra and got an injected bike. In fact my brother had a katana 750 that was his first and only carb bike, and he told me when I was looking for a bike that if I bought a bike with carbs he would personally go and detune them every night as punishment for being so stupid. So while I may not have any experience with them I think I can still advise you to stay away from them.

Also as far as looking for a starter bike, Honda just go look at a Honda....

the_fornicator
January 23rd, 2012, 04:48 PM
I dunno, I'd definitely look at kms when buying a bike. Most people that buy it here don't take care of their bikes at all -they'll just buy it, ride it and sell it without so much as an oil change over the course of their ownership.

Combine our rough roads which are super hard on a bike's suspension and the high probability that 99% of a bike's kms in Edmonton will be city kms, I think kms definitely matter. Moreover, the majority of bikes are owned by inexperienced riders who don't know how to shift and will try to do a wheelie on the bike before passing it on to someone else.

There's the exception of the small % of owners who know what they're doing in terms of maintenance, but, for the most part, I'd definitely take the kms into consideration, but apply a caveat on that statement wherein one should also take into consideration the age of the owner, number of previous owners, condition of the bike, ability to provide receipts (I keep my receipts for oil+filter to prove how often I change the oil if I want to sell my bike down the road), modifications, etc.

By playing the numbers game, the fewer kms a bike has, the less of a chance the owner(s) have had to crash the thing. This isn't to be taken as gospel, but speaking from my own personal experience from buying used bikes. I've seen more lemons than I can shake a stick at.

janz3n
January 23rd, 2012, 05:26 PM
good info. def going injected. still not sure if i should go 600 right away or 125-250. from what iv seen the price difference between a 125-250 and a 600 is not much. i do have experience riding dirt bikes, but the biggest one iv ever rode was a 80cc. i'll figure out what i can handle when i take the ctec course.

DucatiBrad
January 23rd, 2012, 05:47 PM
There are a lot of bikes that fit in between the 125/250s and 600s if your not totally set on a "sport" bike. That 599 that Dave posted is a great choice. SV's seem to be the standard in-between bike but there are always bikes like Monsters, the Ninja 400 or FZ6. In my experience I find that if you want to have the most fun possible for cheap on the street get a motard. If you want to look cool and still have fun get a sportbike:D

The newer gixxer 6's have that dms switch that allows you to change power delivery and throttle sensitivity.

SilverNeonRacer
January 23rd, 2012, 07:02 PM
While the ninja 400 is a good bike, when I was looking for the wife a lot of reviews said it wasn't worth it, and you might as well go 650R.

The other question is do you want a supersport(quicker, rev higher, blah, blah) or just a sport. The ninja 650R is a paralle twin FI bike. it's a "sport" so it's cheaper for insurance than a ss 600. Sure it won't accelerate as fast, sure it tops out only at about 200km/h but really.. is that a big deal? The 650 is a low end torquey bike, great for around town, you can actually ride it at sub 3000rpm.

ChuckNorrisKicksAss
January 23rd, 2012, 07:05 PM
What are your thoughts on lowering a sportbike, by taking the links out or putting them in( cant remember which way it is). The reason I ask is because Im only five foot fuck all(5`6"). I have been reading on ESR a out it and it seems like there is mixed views regarding it.

SilverNeonRacer
January 23rd, 2012, 07:08 PM
They make 2" lowering kits for most bikes, beyond that, i dunno.. I haven't looked.

My wife is 5'5" or 5'7" (I can't remember) and she has no problems on her 2011 Ninja 650R.

ChuckNorrisKicksAss
January 23rd, 2012, 07:12 PM
They make 2" lowering kits for most bikes, beyond that, i dunno.. I haven't looked.

My wife is 5'5" or 5'7" (I can't remember) and she has no problems on her 2011 Ninja 650R.

How does the 650r compare to a 600 supersport bike, seat height wise?

CanuckDave
January 23rd, 2012, 07:22 PM
What are your thoughts on lowering a sportbike, by taking the links out or putting them in( cant remember which way it is). The reason I ask is because Im only five foot fuck all(5`6"). I have been reading on ESR a out it and it seems like there is mixed views regarding it.

I honestly wouldn't think your height would be that big a deal, I know several girls shorter than you that ride bikes that aren't lowered. At worst you might have to take half an ass-cheek off the seat to get your foot on the ground at a set of lights.

Lowering a bike will change the suspension geometry, which is why it's generally not recommended. There are other things you can do, like modifying the seat (shaving down the seat foam) to make it a little shorter if it really comes to it.

SilverNeonRacer
January 23rd, 2012, 07:26 PM
How does the 650r compare to a 600 supersport bike, seat height wise?
Ninja 650R seat height is 31.7"
Ninja 600(supersport) 32.1" Ninja 10R is 32" even So just under 1/2"
Ninja 400: 31.1"
Ninja 250R: 30.5"

Now that 1.2" between the 250 and the 650, I can tell the difference easy, but the 650 is a touch wider too.

Brutetork
January 23rd, 2012, 07:58 PM
I dunno, I'd definitely look at kms when buying a bike. Most people that buy it here don't take care of their bikes at all -they'll just buy it, ride it and sell it without so much as an oil change over the course of their ownership.

Combine our rough roads which are super hard on a bike's suspension and the high probability that 99% of a bike's kms in Edmonton will be city kms, I think kms definitely matter. Moreover, the majority of bikes are owned by inexperienced riders who don't know how to shift and will try to do a wheelie on the bike before passing it on to someone else.

There's the exception of the small % of owners who know what they're doing in terms of maintenance, but, for the most part, I'd definitely take the kms into consideration, but apply a caveat on that statement wherein one should also take into consideration the age of the owner, number of previous owners, condition of the bike, ability to provide receipts (I keep my receipts for oil+filter to prove how often I change the oil if I want to sell my bike down the road), modifications, etc.

By playing the numbers game, the fewer kms a bike has, the less of a chance the owner(s) have had to crash the thing. This isn't to be taken as gospel, but speaking from my own personal experience from buying used bikes. I've seen more lemons than I can shake a stick at.

Good points for sure, I just meant km's aren't as important as the actual owners themselves. My brother's bike has 62000kms and runs better than most with less than half that because it was owned by a honda mechanic who knew what the fuck he was doing.

Now as far as the 125-250 bikes go.. Don't fucking bother. Just get something like a 600 and show some self-control and you'll be just fine. I jumped right to a 919 from dirtbikes and never had any issues because I knew my limits. That being said I don't advise starting that big but you should be more than fine on a 600 or 750.

SilverNeonRacer
January 23rd, 2012, 08:14 PM
I don't know about hoping on a supersport straight off. Well I should say it depends on the person, if you're confortable with self control, etc, etc you'll be fine. However, I work with a guy who in day to day things he's fine, but for some reason has 0 confidence on a bike. He has a 800cc cruiser, it's peppy, but not overly fast as far as bikes go, and he just can't seem to get any confidence on it, and is always over thinking to the point of making mistakes. Mind you he does need more seat time. He took a course twice in Calgary, my wife keeps bugging him that he needs to take CTEC's course.

Myself I rode the 250 in the course for 2 days, 1100cc cruiser for 3 months then up to an 1800cc cruiser. I have riden my wife's bikes (Ninja 250 and her 650) I have very little seat time on a supersport, just buddies VFR1000, but the clutch was twitchy.. he fixed that.

janz3n
January 23rd, 2012, 08:46 PM
My fiancé won't let me get a sport bike. Lol. She wants me to get a cruiser.
Only thing I can see myself riding is a sport bike or this
http://edmonton.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-street-cruisers-choppers-2009-Susuki-GZ250-blk-W0QQAdIdZ334935506

SilverNeonRacer
January 23rd, 2012, 09:01 PM
Not a bad little cruiser.. it's only a 250, so long highway trips maybe "fun".. not that it won't do them, just don't expect to be doing a lot of passing.

This one is similar, with a bit more power:
http://edmonton.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-street-cruisers-choppers-2008-Suzuki-Boulevard-W0QQAdIdZ348020212

I have a grey and black version of this:
http://edmonton.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-street-cruisers-choppers-2009-Suzuki-Boulevard-C109RT-W0QQAdIdZ341071314

seevik
January 23rd, 2012, 09:34 PM
My first bike was an sv650, I highly recommend it. Its a sport touring, great starter bike, but any bike you get, you have to respect it.

janz3n
January 23rd, 2012, 10:00 PM
Not a bad little cruiser.. it's only a 250, so long highway trips maybe "fun".. not that it won't do them, just don't expect to be doing a lot of passing.

This one is similar, with a bit more power:
http://edmonton.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-street-cruisers-choppers-2008-Suzuki-Boulevard-W0QQAdIdZ348020212

I have a grey and black version of this:
http://edmonton.kijiji.ca/c-cars-vehicles-motorcycles-street-cruisers-choppers-2009-Suzuki-Boulevard-C109RT-W0QQAdIdZ341071314

that last link is a huge bike haha. i dont think i could ever ride one of those.

OutOfFocus
January 23rd, 2012, 10:47 PM
Here's the thing:
You can kill yourself just as fast on a 125 as you can on a 1300. It's only as dangerous as your throttle. Buy WHATEVER bike you want WHATEVER sized engine. The ONLY thing you should be looking for on a first bike is whether or not it fits you, and you are comfortable on it. I made the mistake of buying a Ninja 500R as a first machine. I was tired of it within a week and went to my Blackbird. I don't track ride, I ride for fun. I trip on the weekends with my wife on the back. Whatever I have found to be comfortable I've bought. As far as buying an older bike and being worried about parts, head to bikebandit.com or oldbikebarn.com. I got a SHIT load of parts for my 1989 Ninja from them with no hassle whatsoever and shipping within 5 days. The only reason I got ride of that bike and went up to my VFR is because I got a smokin' deal on it. However, I did crash my VFR this year because of being in a hurry. Did not stop to think about cold tires and washed out. I will note that my VFR is an 800, and my Ninja was a 1000. Comfort, common sense, and smarts is what you need. That's my 2 cents.

FreshJive
January 23rd, 2012, 11:07 PM
Here's the thing:
You can kill yourself just as fast on a 125 as you can on a 1300. It's only as dangerous as your throttle. Buy WHATEVER bike you want WHATEVER sized engine. The ONLY thing you should be looking for on a first bike is whether or not it fits you, and you are comfortable on it. I made the mistake of buying a Ninja 500R as a first machine. I was tired of it within a week and went to my Blackbird. I don't track ride, I ride for fun. I trip on the weekends with my wife on the back. Whatever I have found to be comfortable I've bought. As far as buying an older bike and being worried about parts, head to bikebandit.com or oldbikebarn.com. I got a SHIT load of parts for my 1989 Ninja from them with no hassle whatsoever and shipping within 5 days. The only reason I got ride of that bike and went up to my VFR is because I got a smokin' deal on it. However, I did crash my VFR this year because of being in a hurry. Did not stop to think about cold tires and washed out. I will note that my VFR is an 800, and my Ninja was a 1000. Comfort, common sense, and smarts is what you need. That's my 2 cents.
Took the words right out of my mouth.
I was in your shoes last year janz3n so i know where you are coming from. I personally thought "I think i'll start small on a 250cc bike and work my way up. When i went to the dealerships to get a feel for the 250's, 500's, 600's, etc i found that the 250 felt WAYYYY too small for me. It felt like i was back on a 125cc bike from my CTEC course. Me being 6'4"ish there was zero comfort even just sitting on the bike so i could only imagine how painful it would be to ride. At the end of the day i ended up going with a '10 GSX-R600 (the ZX-6R was my first choice but didn't have any in stock :(). Even just sitting on the bike getting a feel for it i felt right at home with it.

Like OutOfFocus said, at the end of the day, get the bike that you feel most comfortable on. It doesn't matter if it is a 125cc or a turbo'd 1300cc, you will only go as fast as your right hand allows you to go. Ride at your own pace and not the pace of the people you ride with.

Best of luck and i'm sure you'll enjoy your bike.

SilverNeonRacer
January 24th, 2012, 12:18 AM
Don't get me wrong, some people can hop on a busa and be fine. My point is some people need to build up for personal confidence. My wife started on the Ninja 250R because she had a bad experience on my 700cc snowmobile where she was applying throttle and nothing was happening then all of a sudden it took of and left her standing there. So she didn't want that on a bike so she started small.

She'll probably never need/want anything bigger than her 650R..

Tych23
January 24th, 2012, 04:49 AM
get a bike that you feel comfortable on, i jus got my first bike and its a zx6r , people always say with sportbike croutching over all the time will hurt ure back, and some bikes will make it harder than others, but im a taller guy ,so i almost dont need to be bent over at all,. i had to go with a 600 ,for me anything smaller just seemed to be way to small for a guy my size . even a 600 feels to "small" body size-wise . 600cc is more than enough power

the_fornicator
January 24th, 2012, 09:46 AM
Your wife won't let you get a supersport first and insisted on a cruiser? Weird. For a new rider, there's not much of a difference -you go straight.

My first bike, I went with a 2003 honda 600 CBR f4i. Great bike. I chose it as my first bike because they're known to be a little more forgiving for 600's because they're seen as a little underpowered. 2001-2003 f4is are the first year the CBRs went fuel injected so it was kind of their test run at things.

It's weird. I got bored of the f4i withing a couple of seasons and looked into 750s. I couldn't find a mint one so I bought another 600 which was the 07 honda 600RR. 07 is when Honda totally revamped RR. The thing just seems to have worlds more power and responsiveness compared to the f4i even though they're both 600s.

*shrug* Go with what you want. The fiancee isn't riding the thing so get what you want to get.

janz3n
January 24th, 2012, 10:35 AM
she wants to ride on the back and refuses to ride on the back of a sport bike. i'll most likely end up getting one though, i can see myself riding a cruiser but id rather ride a sport bike. but thats why im going to take the ctec course to see what i feel more comfortable on before buying one. im also 5'6".

seevik
January 24th, 2012, 10:44 AM
If someone hits you on a bike, then there is no difference what you get, but when it comes to making a mistake, adding too much throttle when your on gravel, cold tires, leaning in a corner, that's when size of the motor, and weight of the bike makes world of difference, and where experience comes in play.

nismomaniak
January 24th, 2012, 11:01 AM
buy what you want, not what she wants you to have.

you dont want to be riding around town on a bike you dont like, watching guys ride around on bikes you do like. youll end up selling it and buying one anyways. im sure your girlfriend is pretty awesome, and is likely just scared youll hit a post doing 200kph on whyte. which if you are smart, it wont happen. if you are a dumbass, and a lot are, it will though. keep your ego out of it, dont let some retard that wants to race get you going, and get what you want!

janz3n
January 24th, 2012, 11:10 AM
She doesn't want a sport bike because she thinks only assholes with gelled hair and big egos ride them. I'm non of those. She also thinks only girls that show their thongs ride on the back of them. I know she's mostly joking around because she really just doesn't like them and prefers cruisers because that's what her dad rides. She also wants to be able to take it on trips to jasper or banff and be comfortable.

nismomaniak
January 24th, 2012, 11:15 AM
yeah but is that what YOU want to do?

SilverNeonRacer
January 24th, 2012, 11:16 AM
Heh she wants you to get a cruiser so she can sit up right with a back rest :P And you'd be a lot less likely to pull a wheelie with her on it. (Yes you can wheelie cruisers)

But ya, I like sport bikes, but due to my back and knees(mainly my knees) I can't ride them for more than 15min. I took my wife out for a 30min ride once, I couldn't walk the next day, yes litterally. But I like cruisers too, and I like to carry stuff so a full bagger works well for me.

Ctec has the 125 sportbikes, 250cc cruisers, and 280 dual sports. I found slipping the clutch a lot easier on the dual sports, but again my knees killed me. They encourage you to try the different bikes, iirc the controls are more precise on the sport bikes. And the cruisers it's really easy to drag hard parts, even in the parking lot.

DucatiBrad
January 24th, 2012, 07:30 PM
iirc the controls are more precise on the sport bikes.....

This is especially true as you move up to the bigger sportbikes. More cc's = more power being controlled with the same throttle stroke. Combine that with a bigger, more aggressive bike and it makes the likelihood of a crash even greater. I know I made some dumb moves when I started that probably would have resulted in a crash had I been on a more powerful bike.

imo 600s are okay to start on if you can respect the power. 600s and 1000s run within 1 second of each other in the 1/4

AudiInProgress
January 25th, 2012, 12:18 PM
My first bike was a 1979 Yamaha XS650 Special... It was a great bike to learn on. And even though it was 30 years old, my local dealer had parts IN STOCK, and I was able to repair it up to my standards.

I crashed the bike a block away from home, on my last ride for the year, I was about to put it into storage for winter.

Just remember, there are 2 types of riders, those who have crashed -- and those who will crash.


I then bought myself a 2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 900. It was a nice upgrade, rode it for 3-4 years, and then sold it... It wasn't quite big enough. But I'm huge.


Personally, I think you're an asshole if you don't listen to your wife.

My wife hates motorcycles. And yes, she has ridden on the back of mine a few times, but it's not something she enjoys and it's not something we can enjoy together.

Your wife likes bikes, your wife wants you to have a bike, your wife wants to ride on the back of your bike with you... and you're going to go out and buy a sportbike so she can't?


All these other guys who are saying "fuck what your wife wants, buy what you want" obviously aren't married.

There are some situations where I would agree, that you need to do what's best for you, or you need to ignore your wifes input -- but this is not one of those situations.


You are going to love motorcycling, and you're going to enjoy sharing that experience with your wife, and if you *REALLY* get serious into biking... And you want to start racing or something, then buy another bike, buy a sportbike at that point.


Right now you're just looking for a first bike, and let's face it, you're probably going to crash it, or drop it, or somebody is going to knock it over... Don't buy a really nice machine for your first bike. I'm not saying that 100% for sure you'll ruin it, but the chances are pretty good.

As far as size goes, I honestly wouldn't recommend a 250 or any of that shit, and this type of post is created on the forum ALL THE TIME. And most of the same information gets posted. Some people swear by starting on an itty-bitty bike, the "professional motorcycle teachers" will tell you to buy something small. But in my opinion, it's a waste of money, you're not going to keep that bike for any longer than you have to.

A 600cc bike is a good size to start with. It's something you'll be able to learn fairly easily with, and it's not something that you should get bored with the power right away. And as other people have said, you absolutely must respect the fact that a 600cc bike can kill you in about 3 seconds flat. I rode a 600cc sportbike once, and I'll never climb on another one. Aside from the fact that they're extremely uncomfortable, they're just nuts to ride.


Anyways, take away what you will from my post.

Alwayslast
January 26th, 2012, 10:55 PM
Hmmm, I'm a "professional motorcycle teacher" (as you state) ...and I also know what you mean...yet, I've taught more students (17-18,000 now) than most of the instructors in this province and have never recommended starting small for the sake of learning. We make use of smaller bikes (still street legal) for obvious reasons on our course. The skills on any bike are transferable yet having taught so many different rider sizes, types, skill sets over the last 20 years...to go into automatic mode and just simply recommend a small lower displacement bike for everyone makes zero sense. Hell, we've had rides 4'9" to 6'9" tall and every inseam, arm length, body type, body weight, hand size, head size, foot size, etc, etc, that you could possibly imagine. That being said, I've recommended every size of bike and every type of bike based on the riders current skills, desired type of riding, likes and interests, etc. Having taught with instructors over the years that do make the general recommendations, I can tell you that they are just making a lazy, politically correct, and usually a biased opinion based on nothing more that a few lines in a forum they read once. I think it's just one more reason why the courses that are purely focussed on a safety dogma will slowly disappear over time. Safety or safe riding is NOT a skill, it's an attitude...followed up with working on skills, understanding awareness and leaving the ego at home when they ride. I've recommended sportbikes to so many level headed people and have steered many away until they were mature enough to respect the machine.

Someone said it here earlier, and it's very true. Any size of bike can hurt you or worse, the larger more powerful bikes just get you there quicker...if you don't have skills, knowledge, awareness or the correct attitude.

ChuckNorrisKicksAss
January 26th, 2012, 11:05 PM
When it comes to 600cc SuperSport bikes, is there much difference amongs the 4 major brands(Kawi,Honda,Suzuki,Yamaha). I`m looking for a bike between 2004 and 2006. What I`m wondering is did either of these manufactures have any real bad years where the bikes didn`t perform up to specs?

I have decided that I will be going with a 600cc sport bike and I will also be doing the rider training course.

Alwayslast
January 26th, 2012, 11:17 PM
If you're not racing, I wouldn't even worry about it. The issues with bikes over the past 15 years are negligible. The bike will always be better than any of us. A good rider on any 650 twin sportbike can destroy a poor rider on a 600cc in the twisties. It truly is the rider and not the bike. Personally, get the one that you like the looks of best, that's the one you want to buy. Specs are there to sell bikes to those that only care about wasteful specs. The Honda, Yamaha (albeit common rides) and Kawasaki are my fave bikes but I also love riding bikes like the Triumph Street Triple R or the Suzuki SV650. I like the GSXR but (like the CBR and R6) they're everywhere. But seriously, get what you love the looks of. Modern 600cc race classes are running almost similar lap times to their big brother 1000 superbike class. They're all really good between 2004 to 2006.

nismomaniak
January 27th, 2012, 10:58 AM
almost=p id have to put my two cents in here, and say the lap record is held by a 600cc at stratotech, and the fastest any 1000cc has seen is roughly 2 seconds slower. that said though, the two kids who are neck and neck are 16 and 17, so they dont have the weight the guys on 1000s do either.

but yeah, when looking for a bike, just like a car, look up common issues on them. the shifter popping out of gear, look for non hack job wireing, prefer stock exhaust(imo). if someone has moded their exhaust they should have put a power commander in, and then, sometimes you get more hack wireing, and more problems to track down.
with that said i have been informed that i am wrong on the lap times, and there is only 0.4 seconds between 600s and 1000s, 600s still being faster.

Alwayslast
January 27th, 2012, 12:19 PM
Lol...true, actually, there have been fast guys on Sv's that have clobbered 600's and litre bikes at Stratotech. I should have been clear, Stratotech is a wonderful facility but it is not a proper race track for motorcycle racing. I was the one of the first guys to test stratotech...when we started the EMRA we were running out of Namao and Dan approached myself and two others to test Stratotech for racing motorcycles before the final layer of asphalt went down. It's a fun track but I was referring to national level such as Parts Canada, AMA, World Superbike, etc. But, I get what you mean. I was talking about large tracks like Willow Springs, Laguna, Mosport, etc...

Truly, a stock bike with only a gearing change and race DOT's has easily run minute flats...the rest of the bits don't amount to much on a track like Stratotech. Point is, the rider is everything and the bike doesn't matter as much as it use too...bikes are hard to kill these days, I know..I've tried! ;)

nismomaniak
January 27th, 2012, 12:22 PM
fair enough. i know where you are coming from.

janz3n
January 28th, 2012, 07:58 AM
your name isnt James Mccarthy by any chance?

question is for alwayslast.

Alwayslast
January 28th, 2012, 03:22 PM
Yes...yes it is.

janz3n
January 28th, 2012, 03:50 PM
thought so, your facebook picture is the same as your avatar on here. i asked about how fast the course fills up for ctec on facebook.

Alwayslast
January 28th, 2012, 03:51 PM
Yes, I remember...just email me if you have any issues...we'll look after you!

ChuckNorrisKicksAss
February 2nd, 2012, 08:18 PM
I'm having such a hard time deciding between new and used. New has waranty, but is also on average 3+ thousqnd more than used. I'm actuall going to go look at a bike in Calgary this weekend if it dont sell tomorrow. 09 with under 2k kms.

Also, if I were 2 buy a bike before I got my class 6, do I have to insure and register it right away. Or can I wait until I get my bike licence?

I would be trucking the bike home obviously......lol and it would be kept in a garage until spring/summer.

SilverNeonRacer
February 2nd, 2012, 08:33 PM
no need to insure/register it until you're riding it... unless you finance, the lein holder may want it insured right away. For the wife's 2011 Ninja it was that way, for the 09 Ninja it wasn't.

sliptank
February 2nd, 2012, 08:33 PM
If you're not racing, I wouldn't even worry about it. The issues with bikes over the past 15 years are negligible.

See, now you've got me thinking.. I just picked up my first bike this winter, a 1986 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600A with a blown motor (had new Battlax rubber and a V&H full exhaust, figured it was a steal for $310.. plus I used to work at Riverside Yamaha, so I know my sportbike parts pretty well) and although she's not a looker (been dropped many times. the fuel tank looks like the surface of the moon) I plan to rebuild the motor, put all the mechanicals back to spec, and learn to ride it this year and then eventually build it into more of a ratfighter/cafe racer look.

I'm not super worried about learning, as I rode BMX growing up, rode plenty of ATV's, and even drag raced (lake drags) snowmobiles for a while.. but did I perhaps make a crucial mistake picking up such an old sportbike? Anything I should know as a newbie?

Alwayslast
February 5th, 2012, 01:41 AM
I've owned several 1985 to 1989 sportbikes over the years (including many of the Kawi 600 incarnations), I can't see it being a "crucial" issue or concern considering how much you paid and what your plans are for the bike. They're great bikes but no where near the modern sportbike weapons. Outside of the usual ignition, limited suspension travel and adjustment and minor carb concerns of that era, they're fun to ride. The rider is the weakest link on any machine regardless of the bikes age and capabilities. Enjoy it!