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Thread: How To Build a Race Car

  1. #10
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    Good to know, the mechanical part is easy ...The rest i am new to , and need to learn

  2. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipper2007 View Post
    Good to know, the mechanical part is easy ...The rest i am new to , and need to learn

    creativity is key! It doesn't hurt to just take an idea and hammer it out with tools.

  3. #12
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    Step 1 Build racecar
    Step 2 come out
    Step 3 fun

    -the faster you go
    -the longer you live

  4. #13
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    Excellent post Fugu! I'm not building the NSX, but I do hope to get my mini project going in the near-ish future!

  5. #14
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    Good stuff! Edmonton is likely in for a boom in racing and performance driving, I think the gentlemen that get a jump on getting track time now if they havn't will be the ones taking more trophies at future events!


    I've been doing some research on Safety restraints and i'm about to pull the trigger on a Hans device. Needed to learn what all the ratings meant!




    Standards for Head and Neck Restraints

    There are two standards for these H&NR devices
    SFI 38.1
    FIA 8858
    As is common with all tests dictated by a third party certain aspects of each test case frequently come under question. But overall the goal of each test case is to ensure a H&NR is built to protect the driver wearing the device in an accident. We invite you to read the below summary of the test cases as well as visit the specific website of each test by clicking on the standard number above.
    SFI 38.1
    The new standard is set very high by the SFI 38.1 Head and Neck restraint specification. In order to pass the specification, the restraint has to pass a 70 G, 30 degree angular frontal impact, followed by three straight frontal 70G impacts below 3200 N neck Tension. (The Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards for passenger cars allows 4170N.) To pass, a device has to show good results in limiting maximum upper neck tension, maximum upper neck compression and maximum NIJ. The latter seems to be a composite factor that takes into account not just loads but moments. I think the lowest possible NIJ is the goal not just a one-off good tension or compression number. There is also a section of the SFI Spec 38.1 (single point of release) that calls for a specific design criteria which requires the driver to drag the restraint out the window which means that some devices that meet the impact requirements cannot be certified.
    SFI is funded by the manufacturers and some granting bodies. Manufacturers pay the SFI for each unit they sell. One failing of the SFI is that they don't publish the actual test results - they claim they can't do that because the test results are the property of the manufacturers (manufacturers have the tests done by certified labs and then submit them to SFI for certification). If, for whatever reason, you believe that certain test results are more important for your type of racing, you have to rely on the manufacturers to release that data instead of having SFI provide it. Some of the data is gathered and published at www.racingsafetyinstitute.org
    The latest list of SFI 38.1 certified devices can be found at http://www.sfifoundation.com/manuf.html#38.1
    FIA 8858
    This test was created by the FIA once they were convinced that a H&NR device was needed to protect their drivers. Most of the initial tests were done by Mercedes Benz in a F3 cockpit (see http://www.formula1.com/insight/tech...fo/11/463.html) and are centered around what the FIA defines as a Head and Neck System (HANS) device. The FIA have since tested using rally car type set-ups and indeed HANS devices have been made mandatory in the FIA World Rally Championship as well as other forms of FIA sanctioned racing.
    HANS use will extend, as the FIA are requiring them to be used in more and more series. From the FIA's press release dated December 9, 2005: "From January 1, 2008, an FIA-approved head restraint (HANS) will be mandatory for all drivers and co-drivers in all FIA championships, trophies, cups and challenges. From January 1, 2009 it will be mandatory for entrants in all other events entered on the FIA International Sporting Calendar." See: http://www.fia.com/resources/documen..._2005_WMSC.pdf.
    All F1 teams have licensed the HANS design, but the only current driver to use anything other than a standard Hubbard Downing device is Fernando Alonso (2006).
    The 8858 test is designed to test HANS shaped devices. So far, the FIA has not made a decision to allow other devices into the standardized test and thus enable certification.
    Why 70G?

    Why do the tests use 70G? An accident that delivers 70G to the driver is an absolutely enormous impact. A 45G impact puts a load of around 2500lbs on each shoulder strap so 5000lbs against your body. They picked 70G because of a Sports car accident with Christian Elder where he hit a wall with the A and B pillars of his cup car. This is a hugely strong area of the car and this resulted in a 70G shock to the driver as that section did not deform to help absorb the hit. This lead to 70G being the shock level used for these tests. SFI 16.1 nylon seat belts have broken in 70G sled testing (11000lbs breaking strength). As an example, Dale Earnhardt died with a 42G angular impact with a delta-V of 38mph.
    A 70G driver shock in a normal road car will probably mean an accident big enough to disintegrate the car. These tests use forces way above whats survivable in a normal road car. Plus, road cars deform to absorb the impact, this makes such a high G event more rare. Indy cars and formula 1 cars etc have very stiff passenger cells and if the cell collides with an object, the passenger will experience a high G incident as the energy will be passed through to the driver. Bodies like NASCAR and Indy are now using soft wall technology on their tracks which seems to halve the G of a wall strike when compared with the older hard walls. Ralf Schumacher is probably thankful of this when he struck a soft wall at Indy in 2004.
    How big of an accident will a H&NR protect me from?

    They should protect you as long as the car protects you. If the impact compromises the passenger compartment or the car explodes then a H&NR won't help you. If the impact is such that the car doesn't collapse and you have good belts, mounts, etc then a H&NR will be effective. A proper race car is substantially stronger than a normal road car. As usual, the best advice is lets not find out. Any H&NR restraint with a 70G rating that is lower than 1800N should prevent neck injury in any accident that is survivable, i.e. < 150G shock to driver. Almost all restraints meet this requirement.
    What is a newton?

    One newton can accelerate a kilo at a rate of 1 meter per second. That is, a one Newton force on a 1 kg object results in an acceleration of 1 m/s^2. One newton is the same as 0.22481 pounds of force (4.4N is 1 pound of force).
    So, 4000 newtons on an 80 kilogram person results in an acceleration of 50 meters per second squared. 1G is 9.8m/s^2. So, 4000 newtons on an 80 kg person results in an acceleration force of around 5G on the person.
    These tests don't measure 4000 newtons on the person, they measure it on the neck and the neck/head weighs a lot less than a person so 4000 newtons on just the head/helmet will accelerate it by a much higher G than 5G. Lets say your head weighs 5kgs then 4000 newtons will accelerate it by around 80G if it was free to move.
    (I'd like this information checked by someone with an engineering background if possible)
    Here's an article on newtons.
    How many newtons of neck stress will kill me?

    This seems hard to say. The government uses 4160 newtons as the 40% chance of injury level. SFI and FIA use 4000 newtons (edit: in late 2007, this changed to 3200N) as the pass mark. How many newtons your neck can take depends on:
    Your age, younger is better
    Your weight
    Your fitness level
    Your sex
    and others
    A concern may be that in some sports like drag racing, you can see much older drivers than in other sports and this makes them more prone to neck injuries even with good safety equipment because of their age.
    Isaac, a manufacturer of H&N restraints says that 4000 newtons is the level above which a basilar skull fracture can occur.



  6. #15
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    cool thread great start,

    i built my honda civic from scratch , for rally/road racing

    roll cage leave to the professionals , it is the most important part of any race car its you life.


    so much win , gee and gee, and drs(derek roscheck) welding are all great companies and well known in the racing world

    all cages need to be D.O.M. usually .095 1.75 tube

    cage can be any where from $1500 to $4000 depending on what type of racing
    it's not a ricer it's a racer

  7. #16
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    Greg you have 2 choices! HANS or Hutchins all other devices are not approved!
    the device must be FIA

  8. #17
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    Awesome, thanks for sharing the information.

  9. #18
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    I'm digging this thread up. Edmonton is definitely in for a racing boom and there may be an oppurtunity for people to race cheap.

    A few years ago I was approached around mid winter to join a team to build a chump car for endurance racing. I'm kinda thinking that if anyone is interested in racing they may want to start picking out what friends they know that have a desirable skill for a racing team may it be deep pockets, budget sense, or the ability to tune a motor because I think some big things may happen possibly as soon as next season.

    Turbomike should chime in on this one if he has details. Building a race car takes time so the sooner you start the easier it is to get rolling for next season.


    After my past racing season the only things I can add..

    1)Put a mesh screen in front of your radio. I honestly thing $5.00 worth of chicken wire could have gotten me a Trophy.
    2)Install a 12 volt fan with a switch in the cockpit of the car. You can end up sitting on the grid for up to twenty minutes or longer if an incident happens on the track while it is cleaned up.
    3)Get a good set of hood pins, Self locking if you can, thats a race ender if you forget to latch them.

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