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Thread: 93 2.4l Shadow Part 2 : Project Shadicorn

  1. #10
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    The quick spool valve built into the manifold is a genius idea .


    Wait, you mean you enjoy having a vehicle that's luxurious and practical?
    Blasphemy!
    Rough riding MA70 with a stiff clutch is what you should have!

  2. #11
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    looking forward to the execution of this!

  3. #12
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    I've started doing some FEA and so far things are looking good with only minor modifications. I'll be sure to post that up when I'm done with some explanation for those who find it interesting.

    In the meantime I was able to get some free metal from work and build an assembly table. Big thanks to Don, one of our welders, for helping get everything perfectly straight and square as this is what I will be basing most of my measurements off of. Getting the car onto the rack was quite an adventure. Since I don't have a car hoist or a jack that can go that high I had to get my MacGyver on with a touch of Missouri red neck. It looks worse that what it was but it was "fairly" stable while performing the feat though I didn't dare go underneath it and only got as close as I had to. With a wall winch over a beam in my garage in the back and the engine hoist up front I was able to get the car far enough off the ground to mount to the rack. I think the pictures will speak for themselves.















    Last edited by turboshad; July 23rd, 2017 at 08:41 AM.

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    AudiInProgress (May 25th, 2016)

  5. #13
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    It doesn't look like the worst way to life a car. Seeing as its completely stripped, with no drive train.


    Wait, you mean you enjoy having a vehicle that's luxurious and practical?
    Blasphemy!
    Rough riding MA70 with a stiff clutch is what you should have!

  6. #14
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    The hook on the i-beam looks sketch as hell haha. Awesome.

  7. #15
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    I did some work with the intake today. Tilted the runners 10 to match the ports better and I thought this made for a cool pic.

    Last edited by turboshad; July 27th, 2017 at 03:10 PM.

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    EDISKRAD EHT (June 7th, 2016)

  9. #16
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    I've gotten through some FEA and so far things are looking good. I am close to finalizing the front end design which means I can then start building and more importantly machining. Here are some nice colorful pictures of full straight line braking for you to enjoy in pure nerd form.

    First is a mesh plot. This is a necessary step in FEA so the computer knows how to segment to part to make its calculations. Each node formed by the triangles will get calculated and assigned a stress and displacement by the solver. This will then allow the generation of rainbows and boring videos to see how your parts will react under load.





    Once meshed the FEA solver can do its job and calculate all the values depending on how the part is constrained and loaded. This plot shows the results in terms of the factor of safety. The factory of safety in this case is a ratio of total stress to the yield stress of the material. Simply put anything above a FOS of 1 won't yield and anything below will. This type of plot is quite useful when multiple material types are used such as aluminum and steel in this case. It lets me see how close the whole system is to its given yield strengths. With a straight stress plot I would have to determine and calculate the highest stress areas to see if it is OK in the material it is present in. Another useful feature, though very boring in pictures, is the ability to hide all areas below or above certain FOS values. This lets me see where the stress is starting and watch it "grow" through the part giving distinct stress paths. In this particular plot the scale is from 1 (red) to 30 (blue) to show the FOS distribution through the parts. The test was done with 1250lbf of vertical load and 1250lbf of horizontal load with 1450ftlb of torque from the brake caliper in a clockwise rotation.





    This last plot shows the displacement magnified 50 times more visually than real life. The scale shows a maximum total system deflection of 0.039" which is shown in red and gets less as the colors fade to blue. I like these plots to see how the pieces will deform as well as I can see if the deformation is realistic to what I expect to know if I have constrained and loaded the model properly.




    Here is a link to what I've been told is a boring video of the displacement happening. It is better to see on a loop cycling in both directions but this is all I got converting out to an avi. and I'm too lazy to edit.





    I don't know if the above is interesting to others but I thought I'd try to explain some of the process to those not familiar with it. Feel free to ask any questions and I will do my best to answer them. On a more material note, and probably more interesting to most, I received my wheels and tires and got them mounted. They are 255/40r17 BF Goodrich Rivals on Enkei RPF1 17x10 wheels with an 18mm offset. They have a bit of stretch using a 10" wheel with a 10" tire but this should help get the most traction out of them I can. The first compares the 17x10 Enkei wheel to my previous 215/45r17s, the rest are just to make it look like I'm actually accomplishing something.







    Last edited by turboshad; July 27th, 2017 at 03:22 PM.

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    AudiInProgress (September 1st, 2016)

  11. #17
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    Are you an engineer or something? That's pretty in depth stuff, I find it endlessly fascinating, too bad I suck at school :-(

    Sent from my SM-N900W8 using Tapatalk
    Wasting peoples time, cluttering threads and killing threads since May 2008.

    Just call me Thread Jack AKA Captain OT.


    current ride: WR Blue 2002 Subaru WRX with a 3" catless turbo back exhaust and an AEM cold air intake

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    AudiInProgress (September 1st, 2016)

  13. #18
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    LOL, is it that easy to tell? Yes, I'm a mechanical engineer. Today I found another great use for build threads when you are the sole person working on a project. It's always nice to have an extra set of eyes as a friend on another forum pointed out my error in braking torque. I accidentally doubled up on my inches to feet conversion so the actual torque is 12x more. When I increased the torque the displacement didn't make sense which got me looking into how the loads are actually working through the upright. I think I've got it now, just working out the details and possible some minor changes to the design.

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