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Thread: Be careful out there - crash on Whitemud

  1. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bung View Post
    Weird, I would not have expected that, how big are your tires? I just got a car with much wider tires, I'll have to be mindful about that. I thought it would have much more to do with the quality of the tread pattern and less the width?
    Simple function of physics. The same force on a larger area creates less pressure. That's why it hurts more to be stepped on by a high heel instead of a flat shoe. That's why narrower tires are better for winter, more effective psi. Viper has 355 wide rear tires.

  2. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viktimize View Post
    Simple function of physics. The same force on a larger area creates less pressure. That's why it hurts more to be stepped on by a high heel instead of a flat shoe. That's why narrower tires are better for winter, more effective psi. Viper has 355 wide rear tires.
    Wider tires are actually better in most cases in the winter.

  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaverickXeo View Post
    Wider tires are actually better in most cases in the winter.
    If you want to air down your 4x4 to increase your footprint to go through deep fresh snow then yes. However, that is not "most cases" for anyone here.
    1987 951 - M193 Version for Japan

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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrenan View Post
    If you want to air down your 4x4 to increase your footprint to go through deep fresh snow then yes. However, that is not "most cases" for anyone here.
    Well... If the magical rubber compound sticks to ice & compacted snow (and it somehow obviously does), why would I not want more of it (within reason)?
    I choose to have an OEM width of rubber on my winter tires. No more, and certainly no less.
    $0.02

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JugZ View Post
    Well... If the magical rubber compound sticks to ice & compacted snow (and it somehow obviously does), why would I not want more of it (within reason)?
    I choose to have an OEM width of rubber on my winter tires. No more, and certainly no less.
    $0.02
    It really depends on how thick your steering wheel is.
    1987 951 - M193 Version for Japan

    2015 Jeep Wrangler
    2015 Subaru Impreza
    2005 Chevy 2500 HD

    1819398 1820636 1820914 1821955 1827550 1832642 1834167 1834511 1843685 1845926 1846867 1858945 1870608

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrenan View Post
    It really depends on how thick your steering wheel is.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JugZ View Post
    Well... If the magical rubber compound sticks to ice & compacted snow (and it somehow obviously does), why would I not want more of it (within reason)?
    I choose to have an OEM width of rubber on my winter tires. No more, and certainly no less.
    $0.02

    "Within reason" is the key there.

    It was a simple explanation of why wider tires have a tendency to float more. Maverick just decided to gallop in with his minute understanding of yet another subject to make a semantics argument(which still wasn't right). I'm sure there is some algorithm for determining perfect balance between effective PSI and contact area of a winter tire if someone cares enough to worry about. But that Really has nothing to do with the root of what I was explaining.

  8. #17
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    http://www.continental-tires.com/car...ogy/wide-tires

    A wider tire will be better in most cases since you are correct and it will float more. Running a narrow tire tends to 'cut' through the snow and go down to ice (especially here, where we have frequent freeze/thaws over the winter). Running a wider tire gives you a bigger contact area, also, which means increased stopping surface, etc.

  9. #18
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    nope, different situations will favour wide tires or skinny tires.

    I'd say if you were to balance the pros and cons of both in shitty conditions in winter, skinny tires would probably come out ahead in more situations than wider tires. Floating on top does not paint an image of grip, but digging down does. hovercrafts dont exactly maneuver awesome. blah blah blah.

    ... But for this answer I'd refer to 2017 professional winter motorsport






    wider tires also cost more, so of course tire manufacturers would recommend you running a 335 wide tire if you could be convinced to buy it.

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