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Thread: Be careful out there - crash on Whitemud

  1. #19
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    For our winters, 'floating' is better, especially if you do not have studs. Why would you want to dig into the snow when its deeper (and it does get deep at times) or down to ice (which is common with our frost/thaw periods)?

    For the record; my last set of tires were 'narrow' and were more expensive than the wider variants.

  2. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaverickXeo View Post
    For our winters, 'floating' is better, especially if you do not have studs. Why would you want to dig into the snow when its deeper (and it does get deep at times) or down to ice (which is common with our frost/thaw periods)?

    For the record; my last set of tires were 'narrow' and were more expensive than the wider variants.
    So for the two days a year we have deep snow before it's plowed, that means a floatier tire is better all around? The only thing that gives you traction on ice other than rubber compound and studs, is weight. That's why a narrower tire is better. Get more of the cars weight concentrated on a smaller area instead of spreading it out and decreasing your effective psi. Same cocenpt applies to standing water which is what we were talking about.

  3. #21
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    Why would floating on top of snow be better for traction? The snow acts on more snow, it would be good for ground clearance, but if you have traction to push through the snow, why float on top of it.

    What about this? What has more traction on snow? A fully loaded semi truck, or one bob-tailing (no trailer)? What about 2WD truck with no weight in the box, or the same truck with 500lbs in the box?

    Difference in the 2 scenarios? The contact pressure has changed, in both situations, the vehicle that weighs more has more contact pressure, giving more traction. Another way to increase contact pressure is to reduce contact area. Once you reduce contact area so much, you don't have enough contact area to transmit the forces acting on it, and your grip decreases again. The wider you go from this point, the more you are turning your tires into toboggans, where they float and slide on everything because there is no pressure to act on the grip of the tires. Different terrains require different widths, Snow you usually see skinny, as traction on the surface is low, and its easy to push through, pavement requires the thickest tires to fully transmit the forces of the vehicle, mud usually requires wider tires as you want to float on top of it, but its slippery, but its harder to push through mud. Hopefully I am describing that right.
    1993 B2200, S4 13B Swapped, 5-speed, otherwise stock

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